Other Airstrips and Airports

This is a preliminary summary of many of the airstrips and airports used by Forest Protection Limited in its aerial spray, fire suppression and herbicide programs. The major airstrips used by FPL are listed separately.

Bathurst Regional Airport

Bathurst Regional Airport is located in South Tetagouche, NB.

Active in the aerial spray program

1983 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 12 airstrips, including Bathurst.

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including Bathurst.

1985 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 24 from 12 airstrips, including Bathurst.

1990 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from June 5 to 26 from 4 airstrips, including Bathurst.

Work Flow Sample – 1990

1)    Arrival of insecticide: May 17 to 26

2)    First arrival of Cessnas and navigator crews: May 15

3)    Operational spraying: June 6 to 13

Bathurst airstrip does not have crew facilities, so arrangements were made for personnel to live and eat at the most convenient motels and restaurants.

1991 – May 14 to June 12 (TBMs)

1992 – May 14 to June 12 (TBMs)

Mixing plant at Bathurst airport, 1984.

Bathurst Airport. Source: Canadian Airport Charts, NavCanada, 2008.

Blissville (CFB Gagetown, Department of National Defence)

Bliisville Airport was built in the late 1930s, and operated as a regional airport for southwestern NB, serviced by Trans Canada Airlines (TCA) until 1947. It is now located on Canadian Forces Base Gagetown where it is part of the Range and Training Area; its airport code is CCH3 – Military, with a 4000 ft paved runway. Blissville Airstrip is located at the end of Airport Road, Hoyt, Sunbury County, NB. The airstrip is abandoned (NavCanada 2006) and now used for Autoslalom events (see the video).

Active in the aerial spray program

1958 – We have images of TBM Avengers at Blissville in 1958.

1971-1974 – no details

1976 – May 17 to June 4 (TBMs); four AgTrucks were used to treat smaller irregular areas four airstrips from May 25 to June 21, including Blissville.

1977 – May 2 to June 10 (TBMs)

Work Flow Example – 1977

1)    Set-up of living facilities: March 28 to late April

2)    Installation of new electrical and hydro services: mid April to late April

3)    Preparation of new site and installation of loading facilities: mid April to early May

4)    Arrival of aviation gasoline: first delivery on March 4

5)    Arrival of insecticide: first delivery on May 4

6)    Arrival of TBMs: FPL (20 aircraft), prior to May 9; Conair (8 aircraft), May 5-7

7)    School for TBM pilots: May 8 to mid May

8)    Calibration of TBMs: April 27 to May 18

9)    Arrival of Cessnas and navigator crews: May 19

10)  Dispersal of TBMs to Dunphy (May 19) and Boston Brook (May 23)

11)  Operational spraying: May 22 to June 10

12)  Clean-up of systems, tanks, etc.: June 10, after end of operational spraying, to early July, with a final inspection and clean-up later in July

13)  Closing up camp: June 10, after end of operational spraying, with a final inspection and clean-up in August

1978 – May 26 to June 16 (TBMs)

1979 – May 22 to June 15 (TBMs); an experimental spray was conducted out of Blissville using two Grumman AgCats, May 29 to 30.

Skyway TBM #602 and possibly Wheeler TBM #507 at Blissville NB, 1958. Note the houses in the background.

TBMs #E22, #E32 and others lined up at Blissville NB, May 1976.

Blissville Airstrip, June 1979. Six TBMs are lined up at the rear.

CFB Chatham / Miramichi Airport

Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Chatham’s military history (from 1941) is detailed in Chatham: An Airfield History by Col. A. M. Lee, published in 1989 by Unipress Ltd., Fredericton, NB (ISBN 0-9691253-4-8). CFB Chatham was closed in 1990, but the Miramichi Municipal Airport continues to operate at the aerodrome. The provincial Department of Natural Resources (DNR) now operates its Air Tanker Base out of the airport during the summer months, with tankers supplied by FPL, which also has facilities there since 1994.

Active in the aerial spray program

1976 – May 26 to June 19 (TBMs and DC-6s)

1980 – May 27 to June 20 (TBMs and DC-6)

Work Flow Example – 1980

1)    Arrival of insecticide: May 10

2)    Arrival of DC-6: May 24

3)    First arrival of Aztec and navigator crew: May 21

4)    Operational spraying: May 27 to June 20

Storage tanks at Chatham, 1980.

TBM #21 airborne, Miramichi NB, August 2001. Miramichi Airport can be seen in the distance.

FPL hangar at Miramichi Airport, May 2006.

FPL TBMs #23 FIMR and #10 GFPT at Miramichi Airport, May 2006.

Miramichi Aerodrome. Source: Canadian Airport Charts, NavCanada, 2008.

Charlo Airstrip

The former Charlo airstrip, located in Mountain Brook near Charlo (the Mountain Brook Airstrip), was owned and operated by FPL. The airstrip was constructed in 1953 and sold to an individual in 1979. Remediation took place in 2003 (see below).

The Charlo Regional Airport, which is located about 2 km to the northeast, was used by FPL from the 1970s onward (see separate listing).

Location of Charlo Airstrip from 1952 budworm spray project map. (Source: L.S. Webb, 1952)

Constructed

1953

Active in the aerial spray program (Charlo Airstrip)

1953-1958 – no details

Charlo Airstrip in the 1950s, looking south.

Stearman fleet parked at Charlo Airstrip, 1950s. The hills of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula can be seen in the distance.

Pilots and observers discussing flight lines before takeoff, Charlo Airstrip, July 1955.

Charlo Airstrip Remediation

In the fall of 2001 a concern arose about the possible presence of DDT contamination on a developed property in the Charlo area. The property was once the Charlo airstrip (1953-1958) used in the spruce budworm control project. Property was purchased, a house and a former dump site were removed, contaminated areas were covered with soil and a municipal park was constructed.

The following images are taken from a presentation given by MGI at the Contaminated Properties Conference, Halifax, NS, 21 October, 2003.

Locations of Charlo Airstrip in the Mountain Brook area, and Charlo Airport. (MGI)

Site of the park at the south end of the former Charlo airstrip, 2003. (MGI image, from the FPL files)

The remediated airstrip is now the site of a park under the jurisdiction of the Village of Charlo. (MGI)The playground on 30 August 2009.

The playground on 30 August 2009.

Charlo Airport

The former Charlo airstrip, located in Mountain Brook near Charlo (the Mountain Brook Airstrip), was owned and operated by FPL (see separate listing). The Charlo Regional Airport, which is located about 2 km to the northeast of the Charlo airstrip, was used by FPL from the 1970s onward.

Active in the aerial spray program

1975 – June 18 to 23 (TBMs)

1976 – June 4 to 20 (TBMs)

1977 – June 9 to 24 (TBMs)

Work Flow Example – 1977

1)    Relocation of loading and mixing area: Ground clearing and preparation was started in early January and completed in February with final completion in May

2)    Set-up of living facilities: April and early May

3)    Arrival of insecticide: first delivery on May 20

4)    Arrival of aviation gasoline: first delivery on March 8

5)    Arrival of Cessnas and navigator crews: one team June 1 and three teams on June 10

6)    Arrival of TBMs: one team June 1 and three teams on June 10

7)    Operational spraying: June 9 to 24

8)     Clean-up of systems, tanks, etc.: June 24, immediately after the end of operational spraying, with a final inspection in August

9)     Closing up camp: June 24, camps were removed from the area immediately after the end of operational spraying, with removals completed by early July

1980 – June 2 to 11 (TBMs); an experimental spray was conducted using two Stearmans, two AgTrucks, one helicopter and eight Pawnees from June 2 to 11 from 8 airstrips, including Charlo.

1981 – June 3 to 19 (TBMs); May 30 to June 18 (DC-6s)

1982 – June 4 to 19 (TBMs); a small spray aircraft program was conducted from June 5 to 15 from 6 airstrips, including Charlo.

1983 – June 4 to 19 (TBMs); May 27 to June 19 (DC-6s); a Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 12 airstrips, including Charlo.

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including Charlo.

1985 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 24 from 12 airstrips, including Charlo.

1988 – May 28 to June 9 (DC-6s)

1989 – May 30 to June 14 (DC-6s)

1990 – June 6 to 16 (TBMs)

Work Flow Example – 1990

1)    Arrival of insecticide: May 9-22

2)    First arrival of TBMs: April 27

3)    Calibration of TBMs: May 2-23

4)    Arrival of Cessnas and navigator crews: May 15

5)    Arrival of TBM pilots: May 15

6)    Recurrency training for TBM pilots: May 16-17

7)    Operational spraying: June 6-16

Charlo Airport – TBM and Cessna parking, June 1981.

Charlo airport – camp area from air, June 1981.

Checking insecticide (Bt) drums at Charlo Airport, 1988.

Charlo Airport, Canada Flight Supplement (NavCanada. 2008).

Charlo Airport, Canada Flight Supplement (NavCanada. 2008).

Chipman Airport

Chipman Airport (TC LID: CCS4) is a private airfield still owned and operated by J.D. Irving Woodlands (NavCanada 2006). It is located 3.7 km (2.3 mi) southwest of Chipman, New Brunswick.

Constructed

1964 – no details

Active in the aerial spray program

1965, 1966, 1969-1971, 1974 – no details

1975 – May 20 to June 16 (TBMs)

1979 – May 21 to June 7 (TBMs)

Work Flow Example – 1979

1)    Arrival of insecticide: April to end of project

2)    First arrival of TBMs: May 18

3)    First arrival of Cessnas and navigator crews: May 13

4)    Operational spraying: May 21 to June 7

1980 – May 24 to June 3 (TBMs)

1983 – May 21 to June 8 (TBMs); a Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 12 airstrips, including Chipman.

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including Chipman.

1985 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 24 from 12 airstrips, including Chipman.

1986 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 27 to June 21 from 7 airstrips, including Chipman.

Chipman

Camp at Chipman, 1966. [Provided by Norm Ralston]

Mobile mix setup at Chipman Airport, 1984.

Chipman Airstrip, Canada Flight Supplement (NavCanada. 2008).

Edmundston Airport

Edmundston Airport (ICAO: CYES) is located 17 km (10 mi) northwest of Edmundston, Madawaska County, along the east bank of the Madawaska River. Half of the airstrip is located in the neighbouring province of Quebec. The airport is described by the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association here.

Active in the aerial spray program

1975 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted June 3 to 9 from 3 airstrips, including Edmundston.

1976 – Four AgTrucks were used to treat smaller irregular areas from four airstrips from May 25 to June 21, including Edmundston.

1980 – An experimental spray was conducted using two Stearmans, two AgTrucks, one helicopter and eight Pawnees, June 2 to 11, from 8 airstrips, including Edmundston.

1981 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 6 airstrips, including Edmundston.

1983 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 12 airstrips, including Edmundston.

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including Edmundston.

Edmundston Airstrip, Canada Flight Supplement (NavCanada. 2008).

Fredericton Airport

The Greater Fredericton International Airport (IATA: YFC, ICAO: CYFC) is located in Lincoln, southeast of Fredericton. It is the permanent base of Forest Protection Limited. See also here.

Active in the aerial spray program

1958, 1960-1962, 1964-1966 – no details

1983 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 12 airstrips or airports, including Fredericton.

1987 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 27 to June 17 from 4 airstrips, including Fredericton.

1988 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 8 to June 18 from 4 airstrips, including Fredericton.

Fredericton airport: TBM fleet of 12 parked, 1988.

Fredericton Aerodrome. Source: Canadian Airport Charts, NavCanada, 2008.

Grafton

See Woodstock.

Grand Falls Airport

Grand Falls Airport (TC LID: CCK3), is a private airfield located 4.8 km northeast of Grand Falls, Victoria County, NB. See also here.

Active in the aerial spray program

1975 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted June 3 to 9 from 3 airstrips, including Grand Falls.

1976 – Four AgTrucks were used to treat smaller irregular areas from four airstrips from May 25 to June 21, including Grand Falls.

1980 – An experimental spray was conducted using two Stearmans, two AgTrucks, one helicopter and eight Pawnees, June 2 to 11, from 8 airstrips, including Grand Falls.

1981 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 6 airstrips, including Grand Falls.

1983 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 12 airstrips, including Grand Falls.

Grand Falls Airstrip, Canada Flight Supplement (NavCanada. 2008).

Green River

Green River (Rivière-Verte) is the site of a long-term research project that has existed since the 1940s. The Green River site is located within the Fraser Papers Inc. Crown land license in the Kedgwick highlands of northwestern New Brunswick (Madawaska County), about 60 km northeast of Edmundston (47°44’10” N 68°09’00” W) (Canadian Forest Service 2007).

Central Stearmans at Green River NB, 1955.

Grog Brook

Located in Restigouche County, NB; no details. An unmaintained airstrip located adjacent to Highway 17 northeast of Kedgwick, in Restigouche County.

Constructed

1957

Active in the aerial spray program

1957, 1958 – no details

1989 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 28 to June 17 from 4 airstrips, including Grog Brook.

Grog Brook Airstrip on 3 September 2009.

Kesnac

A 20.2 ha property comprising an airstrip and surrounding properties, now woodland, one of three former airstrips owned by FPL.

Constructed

1958 (for 1960 project)

Active in the aerial spray program

1960 – no details

1964 – Eight Stearmans operated from Kesnac; operations were confined to the forest near the settlements along the main St. John River between Hartland and Prince William.

1965, 1967 – no details

Buildings at Kesnac Airstrip, June 1967.

Hornes Gulch

Hornes Gulch Airstrip is located in Restigouche County northeast of St-Quentin. NavCanada (2006) lists it as abandoned.

Location of Horne’s Gulch Airstrip from the 1952 budworm spray project map. (Source: L.S. Webb, 1952)

Constructed

1953

Active in the aerial spray program

1953, 1955-1957 – no details

GPS test with Bell 206, Hornes Gulch Airstrip, September 1983.

McEwans Field (Moncton)

Moncton/McEwen Airport (TC LID: CCG4), was a private aerodrome located adjacent to and north of the City of Moncton. The airstrip is abandoned (NavCanada 2006) and is now used by a skydiving club.

Active in the aerial spray program

1976 – Four AgTrucks were used to treat smaller irregular areas from four airstrips from May 25 to June 21, including McEwans Field.

1983 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 12 airstrips, including McEwans Field.

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including McEwans Field.

1985 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 24 from 12 airstrips, including McEwans Field.

1986 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 27 to June 21 from 7 airstrips, including McEwans Field.

1987 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 27 to June 17 from 4 airstrips, including McEwans Field.

Maritime Air Service FXOM at McEwen’s Field, near Moncton, NB, 11 August 1970. Yellow with red trim. (Barrie MacLeod)

MacFarlane

No details.

Constructed

1957

Active in the aerial spray program

1957 – no details

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including MacFarlane.

Renous

Renous Airstrip (CDK4) is an unpaved civilian airstrip with a runway of 2900 ft (884 m), located 120 km west of Miramichi, NB, in Northumberland County. NavCanada (2006) lists it as abandoned.

Constructed

1954

Renous Airstrip was built by Ashley A. Colter’s Diamond Construction Company. At the time there was no road into this then remote area of New Brunswick. More than 64 kilometres of road had to be built by FPL using heavy earth moving equipment.

Active in the aerial spray program

1954, 1955, 1957, 1958 – no details

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including Renous.

Renous Airstrip, NB, 1950s. (Canada Dept. Agriculture photo #40650-12)

Rogersville

The airstrip is now used by a flight school located in Rogersville, Northumberland County, NB, although NavCanada (2006) lists its status as unknown.

Active in the aerial spray program

1981 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 6 airstrips, including Rogersville.

Rose Hill

An 18.2 ha property comprising an airstrip and surrounding properties, now woodland, one of three former airstrips owned by FPL. The site was prepared for reclamation in 1993.

Constructed

1953

Active in the aerial spray program

1953, 1954, 1956, 1957 – no details

1981 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 6 airstrips, including Rose Hill.

Location of Rose Hill Airstrip from the 1952 budworm spray project map. (Source: L.S. Webb, 1952)

Rosehill Airstrip in probably the late 1950s.

Rosehill Airstrip, June 1981, during small aircraft spray program.

AgCat, mixing plant and DNR water tank, Rosehill Airstrip, June 1981.

Site preparation, Rosehill Airstrip, 20 June 1993.

After site preparation, Rosehill airstrip, NB, 20 June 1993

Scoudouc

Royal Canadian Air Force Station Scoudouc was a World War ll airstrip owned by the Department of National Defense; RCAF Detachment Scoudouc officially closed on 1 January 1965. Since 1959 it has been used by a drag racing club.

Active in the aerial spray program

1962 – no details

St. Quentin (Saint-Quentin)

Saint-Quentin Aerodrome (TC LID: CDC4), is a privately owned airstrip located 1.9 km (1.2 mi) northwest of Saint-Quentin, Restigouche County, New Brunswick.

Active in the aerial spray program

1982 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from June 5 to 15 from 6 airstrips, including St. Quentin.

1983 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 12 airstrips, including St. Quentin.

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including St. Quentin.

1985 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 24 from 12 airstrips, including St. Quentin.

St-Quentin Airstrip, Canada Flight Supplement (NavCanada. 2008).

St. Stephen Airport

St. Stephen Airport (TC LID: CCS3), is located 1.9 km (1.2 mi) northeast of St. Stephen, Charlotte County, NB. See also here and here.

Active in the aerial spray program

1975 – May 25 to June 10 (TBMs)

St Stephen Airstrip, Canada Flight Supplement (NavCanada. 2008).

Sisson Ridge

Sisson Ridge Airstrip was located west of Plaster Rock, Victoria County.

Active in the aerial spray program

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including Sisson Ridge.

1985 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 24 from 12 airstrips, including Sisson Ridge.

Sussex Airport

See here and here.

The construction of an airstrip 5.6 km southwest of Sussex and the use of four other bases were required to cover the substantial acreages in 1971. Sussex was “built in the fall of 1970 and brought into operational condition in the spring of this [1971] year.” [1971 FPL Annual Report] A 17.0 ha property comprising an airstrip and surrounding properties was eventually sold to a private operator. The airstrip is still active (NavCanada 2006).

Active in the aerial spray program

1971-1973 – no details

1975 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted June 3 to 9 from 3 airstrips, including Sussex.

1976 – May 20 to June 6 (TBMs)

1983 – TBM use of Sussex Airstrip was cancelled because of public opposition.

Sussex Airstrip, Canada Flight Supplement, 2008.

Taxis

A 20.2 ha property comprising an airstrip and surrounding properties, now woodland, one of three former airstrips owned by FPL.

Constructed

1956

Active in the aerial spray program

1956-1958, 1960, 1965, 1966 – no details

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including Taxis.

Mobile mixing plant at Taxis airstrip, 1984, for small spray aircraft program.

Trout Brook

Trout Brook was located northwest of Miramichi, Northumberland County, NB. It was constructed in 1965 (FPL Web Timeline).

Active in the aerial spray program

1966 – no details

Weyman Field

Weyman Field, now known as Weyman Airpark, is a small airfield northwest of Fredericton adjacent to the Keswick River, and southeast of Burtts Corner in York County, now used for patagliding.

Active in the aerial spray program

1980 – An experimental spray was conducted using two Stearmans, two AgTrucks, one helicopter and eight Pawnees, June 2 to 11, from 8 airstrips, including Weyman Field.

1981 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 6 airstrips, including Weyman Field.

1982 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from June 5 to 15 from 6 airstrips, including Weyman Field.

1983 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 12 airstrips, including Weyman Field.

1985 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 24 from 12 airstrips, including Weyman Field.

1986 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 27 to June 21 from 7 airstrips, including Weyman Field.

Weyman Airpark, Canada Flight Supplement (NavCanada. 2008).

Woodstock Airport (Grafton)

The Woodstock Airport is a small public airport located east of Woodstock in nearby Grafton.

Active in the aerial spray program

1980 – An experimental spray was conducted using two Stearmans, two AgTrucks, one helicopter and eight Pawnees, June 2 to 11, from 8 airstrips, including Woodstock.

1983 – A Private Woodlot Spraying Program was conducted from May 21 to June 17 from 12 airstrips, including Woodstock.

1984 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 21 from 14 airstrips, including Grafton.

1985 – A small spray aircraft program was conducted from May 26 to June 24 from 12 airstrips, including Grafton.

Mobile mixing plant at Woodstock, 1983.

Woodstock Airport, Canada Flight Supplement (NavCanada. 2008).

References

NavCanada. 2006. Moncton VFR Navigation Chart, February 2006.

NavCanada. 2008. Canada Flight Supplement, 31 July, 2008. Canada and North Atlantic Terminal and Enroute Data. Part 3 – Aerodromes.

Webb, L.S. 1952. Report on Survey of Spruce Budworm Infestation and Damage on New Brunswick and Quebec Limits of New Brunswick International Paper Company. Canadian International Paper Company, Forest Engineering Department, Eastern Division, Nov. 3, 1952. [FPL archives]

Location of Charlo Airstrip from 1952 budworm spray project map. [Source: L.S. Webb, 1952]

6 responses to “Other Airstrips and Airports

  1. My dad flew out of Taxis in June 1957 and was killed in a Stearman crash about 3 miles south of Budworm City 6/20/1957. His name was Elwyn Behnke he flew for Medford Air Service. Any info or pictures would be helpful

    Thanks

  2. Taxis was also functioning during the 1964 season, I believe it was more of a main headquarters strip. I think the helicopter was based out of here also as I recall being there for a few days before getting posted to Juniper.

  3. In May/June 1975 I was hired by FPL to work as a radio operator at the air field near Juniper, NB but I don’t see it listed here. I believe the field was owned by JD Irving. I can remember the first day the Conair planes arrived from British Columbia, flying past in formation before finally landing like the ‘turkeys’ they were nicknamed after. I can also remember a few ‘mishaps’ but fortunately, no one was seriously hurt at that time. Those Avengers were tough birds and so were their pilots! Met some good people and it was a very interesting summer job.

  4. Fascinating to see the photos of airstrips used by FPL and its predecessor and how they look today. Must have been some interesting take offs and landings! It would make a great read by those early pilots. I have talked to Ken Atkins and JJ Lavigne about some of their memorable flights…should be a book written on it all. Great photos!

  5. The Charlo Airport picture with caption “Charlo Airstrip in the 1950s, looking south” is reversed. It is facing south, but the negative was reversed (East West). The strip was on the west side of Craig Road, confirmed by the black and white picture below it.

    Thank you for sharing these pictures!

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